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........... O Blood and Water, which gushed forth from the Heart of Jesus as a fount of Mercy for us, I trust in You! ???????Woman Woman clothed with the sun, come and do not delay I II am the Mother of 'America, you belong to me, the child of my heart. No one will steal you from me...you have not yet reached your greatest moment. The truly great moment of your history, the moment when you will save the world still lies ahead.' ★ LOCUTIONS 2012 & 2015In the end my Immaculate Heart will triumph. ★LOCUTIONS 2014 ★ ......................... ★ O Blessed Virgin, Mother of ★ O Blessed Virgin, Mother of the Savior, Scatter the forces ★ O Blessed Virgin, Mother of the Savior, Scatter the forces of evil so they are not engrossed in darkness but can come to Light! amen, amen. † LOCUTIONS to the WORLD 9/29-10/9/13 ..................................................***************************

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Utterly Predictable News Flash: Pope Mistranslated - WHAT POPE FRANCIS ACTUALLY SAID -





Our Lady Queen of Peace of Medjugorje’s October 2, 2013 Message Given through Mirjana on the Day for Non-Believers medjugorje


"The stuff the Pope says scares me too, but there is a slight possibility he actually has his sights on the real problem."
August@CMR

"If you want to know what Francis really said, read the interview - in Italian if possible as the English translation is bad." Nathan
» WDTPRS: What Did The Pope Really Say? 1 – UPDATES
» Utterly Predictable News Flash: Pope Mistranslated NCR
» Did Pope Francis just say that evangelization is “nonsense”? 8 things to know and share NCR

“I have a dogmatic certainty: God is in every person’s life. Even if the life of a person has been a disaster, even if it is destroyed by vices, drugs or anything else – God is in this person’s life. You can, you must try to seek God in every human life. Although the life of a person is in a land full of thorns and weeds, there is always a space in which the good seed can grow. You have to trust God.” The exclusive interview with Pope Francis


the galaxy stretching across the sky at Cape Palliser, New Zealand – photo: Mark Gee

“Everything we believe about God, and everything we know about man, prevents us from accepting that beyond the limits of the Church there is no more salvation, that up to the time of Christ all men were subject to the fate of eternal damnation. We are no longer ready and able to think that our neighbor, who is a decent and respectable man and in many ways better than we are, should be eternally damned simply because he is not a Catholic. We are no longer ready, no longer willing, to think that eternal corruption should be inflicted on people in Asia, in Africa, or wherever it may be, merely on account of their not having “Catholic” marked in their passport.

Actually, a great deal of thought had been devoted in theology, both before and after Ignatius, to the question of how people, without even knowing it, in some way belonged to the Church and to Christ and could thus be saved nevertheless. And still today, a great deal of perspicacity is used in such reflections.

Yet if we are honest, we will have to admit that this is not our problem at all. The question we have to face is not that of whether other people can be saved and how. We are convinced that God is able to do this with or without our theories, with or without our perspicacity, and that we do not need to help him do it with our cogitations. The question that really troubles us is not in the least concerned with whether and how God manages to save others.


...Everything we believe about God, and everything we know about man, prevents us from accepting that beyond the limits of the Church there is no more salvation, that up to the time of Christ all men were subject to the fate of eternal damnation. We are no longer ready and able to think that our neighbor, who is a decent and respectable man and in many ways better than we are, should be eternally damned simply because he is not a Catholic. We are no longer ready, no longer willing, to think that eternal corruption should be inflicted on people in Asia, in Africa, or wherever it may be, merely on account of their not having “Catholic” marked in their passport.

Actually, a great deal of thought had been devoted in theology, both before and after Ignatius, to the question of how people, without even knowing it, in some way belonged to the Church and to Christ and could thus be saved nevertheless. And still today, a great deal of perspicacity is used in such reflections.

Yet if we are honest, we will have to admit that this is not our problem at all. The question we have to face is not that of whether other people can be saved and how. We are convinced that God is able to do this with or without our theories, with or without our perspicacity, and that we do not need to help him do it with our cogitations. The question that really troubles us is not in the least concerned with whether and how God manages to save others.

The question that torments us is, much rather, that of why it is still actually necessary for us to carry out the whole ministry of the Christian faith—why, if there are so many other ways to heaven and to salvation, should it still be demanded of us that we bear, day by day, the whole burden of ecclesiastical dogma and ecclesiastical ethics? And with that, we are once more confronted, though from a different approach, with the same question we raised yesterday in conversation with God and with which we parted: What actually is the Christian reality, the real substance of Christianity that goes beyond mere moralism? What is that special thing in Christianity that not only justifies but compels us to be and live as Christians?

It became clear enough to us, yesterday, that there is no answer to this that will resolve every contradiction into incontrovertible, unambivalent truth with scientific clarity. Assent to the hiddenness of God is an essential part of the movement of the spirit that we call “faith.” And one more preliminary consideration is requisite. If we are raising the question of the basis and meaning of our life as Christians, as it emerged for us just now, then this can easily conceal a sidelong glance at what we suppose to be the easier and more comfortable life of other people, who will “also” get to heaven. We are too much like the workers taken on in the first hour whom the Lord talks about in his parable of the workers in the vineyard (Mt 20:1-6). When they realized that the day’s wage of one denarius could be much more easily earned, they could no longer see why they had sweated all day. Yet how could they really have been certain that it was so much more comfortable to be out of work than to work? And why was it that they were happy with their wages only on the condition that other people were worse off than they were? But the parable is not there on account of those workers at that time; it is there for our sake. For in our raising questions about the “why” of Christianity, we are doing just what those workers did. We are assuming that spiritual “unemployment”—a life without faith or prayer—is more pleasant than spiritual service. Yet how do we know that?

We are staring at the trials of everyday Christianity and forgetting on that account that faith is not just a burden that weighs us down; it is at the same time a light that brings us counsel, gives us a path to follow, and gives us meaning. We are seeing in the Church only the exterior order that limits our freedom and thereby overlooking the fact that she is our spiritual home, which shields us, keeps us safe in life and in death. We are seeing only our own burden and forgetting that other people also have burdens, even if we know nothing of them. And above all, what a strange attitude that actually is, when we no longer find Christian service worthwhile if the denarius of salvation may be obtained even without it! It seems as if we want to be rewarded, not just with our own salvation, but most especially with other people’s damnation—just like the workers hired in the first hour. That is very human, but the Lord’s parable is particularly meant to make us quite aware of how profoundly un-Christian it is at the same time. Anyone who looks on the loss of salvation for others as the condition, as it were, on which he serves Christ will in the end only be able to turn away grumbling, because that kind of reward is contrary to the loving-kindness of God.”

Pope Benedict XVI - 1964 sermon

Children of My Divine Heart,
I Am Who I Am. I Am. I Am the Alpha and the Omega. Open your hearts to Me. Surrender. Do not delay. I desire to abide in you. Surrender unto your God. Give Me permission to transform you into instruments of My grace, and mercy. Beloved, do not judge others. Keep your eyes on Me. Encourage others to persevere in love. Many refuse the trials I send. Many curse the day they were born. They reject My teachings, reject all manifestations of My glory, reject Me. Soon they will be brought to their knees. They will witness events that will shake the very foundations of all their convictions. They will be confronted with the Truth, the proof of My existence, the magnitude of My love for all humanity. They will regret their transgressions. Many will crumble before Me. They will be crushed by irrefutable proof that I exist. They will shed tears of perfect contrition. Some will harden their hearts, and remain more disobedient than ever. Pray Beloved. Pray for conversions to take place in the hearts of men. Pray without ceasing for time is of the essence. Live each day as your last. Hope in Me. I will operate miracles all around you in an effort to take back what was stolen from Me. Miracles will abound. My grace will abound as never before. I invite you now to serve in the greatest spiritual battle of all time. Take your rosaries, and engage in battle. Serve Me. You must have no other god. I command you to worship only Me. Be faith filled, and do not accept defeat. Even when you think all is lost, place your hope in Me. I leave you My kiss of peace. Shalom
message to Jabez - 10/2/13